Wicked Problems

The 10 Wicked Problems for the 2017 Health Program were unveiled on June 5th at The Big Reveal.

  1. 1

    Type 2 Diabetes & preDiabetes - Watch the Problem Advocate Video

    In the United States alone, 29 million people have type 2 diabetes and 89 million people have prediabetes.

  2. 2

    Toxic stress - WATCH THE PROBLEM ADVOCATE VIDEO

    Just 4 incidences of toxic stress can shorten life expectancy by 10 years

  3. 3

    Childcare accessibility - Watch the problem advocate video

    Access to affordable childcare is the single largest cause of reduced productivity.

  4. 4

    affordable housing - Watch the problem advocate video

    High housing costs, previously impacting only low-income households, are increasingly impacting middle-income families. 

  5. 5

    Food insecurity - watch the problem advocate video

    Reliable access to food is a problem for millions of Americans, even those above the poverty level.

  6. 6

    Aligning incentives to value - watch the problem advocate video

    Currently our healthcare system provides value to the providers, insurers and pharmaceutical companies - not the public.

  7. 7

    Implementation science - WATCH THE PROBLEM ADVOCATE VIDEO

    There are huge incentives to invent new science, but far less to make sure that that science is incorporated into operational practice.

  8. 8

    Mental Health - WATCH THE PROBLEM ADVOCATE VIDEO

    Global cost of mental disease is expected to grow from $2.5 trillion (in 2010) to $6 trillion by 2030.

  9. 9

    Health literacy - WATCH THE PROBLEM ADVOCATE VIDEO

    Lack of access to accurate, reliable information about health impact consumers' ability to make informed health decisions and affects health outcomes.

  10. 10

    self-determination in wellness - WATCH THE PROBLEM ADVOCATE VIDEO

    Research on behavioral psychology can inform the development of more effective, sustainable wellness solutions.

To submit a Wicked Problem for consideration for a future 10.10.10 program, click here.

THE 10 PROPERTIES OF WICKED PROBLEMS

In 1973, Horst W.J. Rittel and Melvin M. Webber, two Berkeley professors, published an article in Policy Sciences introducing the notion of “wicked” social problems. The article, “Dilemmas in a General Theory of Planning,” named 10 properties that distinguished wicked problems from hard but ordinary problems.